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Professor Kim-Shapiro to be first recipient of the new Harbert Family Distinguished Chair

The following is an excerpt from Provost Jill Tiefenthaler's September 5th Newsletter to the Faculty:

President Hatch is pleased to announce a generous gift from Raymond J. and Kathryn Harbert (Pí06) to establish the Harbert Family Distinguished Chair for Excellence in Teaching and Scholarship. The chair will be awarded to an outstanding teacher whose work is of international renown. The Provost will administer the chair and use it, when possible, to retain an outstanding Wake Forest scholar. We are grateful to the Harbert family for helping to signal Wake Forestís commitment to outstanding teaching and scholarship.

I am pleased to announce that Professor of Physics Daniel Kim-Shapiro is the first scholar to receive the chair. Professor Kim-Shapiro researches the biophysics of hemoglobin and other proteins, and is renowned for his research on sickle cell anemia. As co-leader of a team that includes Wake Forest graduate and undergraduate students, recently he discovered chemistry in hemoglobin that can help scientists pursue better treatments for such conditions as myocardial infarction, pulmonary hypertension, stroke and atherosclerosis, as well as sickle-cell anemia. This research is supported by major grants from the National Institutes of Health.

Professor Kim-Shapiro completed his Ph.D. at U.C. Berkeley in 1993, and came to Wake Forest in 1996. He attended Carleton College as an undergraduate and then served as a Peace Corps volunteer, teaching physics in Zaire for two years before going to graduate school. Professor Kim-Shapiro is highly regarded within the University and the larger Winston-Salem community, as well as internationally in the fields of physics and medicine.

 


 

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